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The whole universe is contained within a single human being – you. Everything that you see around, including the things you might not be fond of and even the people you despise or abhor, is present within you in varying degrees. Therefore, do not look for Satan outside yourself either. The devil is not an extraordinary force that attacks from without. It is an ordinary voice within. If you get to know yourself fully, facing with honesty and hardness both your dark and bright sides, you will arrive as a supreme form of consciousness. When a person knows himself or herself, he or she knows God.
Shams Tabrizi (via al-sabur)

(Source: saalik)

Our strategy should be not only to confront empire, but to lay siege to it. To deprive it of oxygen. To shame it. To mock it. With our art, our music, our literature, our stubbornness, our joy, our brilliance, our sheer relentlessness—and our ability to tell our own stories. Stories that are different from the ones we’re being brainwashed to believe.

The corporate revolution will collapse if we refuse to buy what they
are selling—their ideas, their version of history, their wars, their
weapons, their notion of inevitability.

Remember this: We be many and they be few. They need us more than
we need them. Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing.

Arundhati Roy, January 2003, World Social Forum, Porto Alegre, Brazil (qtd. in x)

There might come a day that Allah allows you to fall in love, and when you do you’ll be unable to fall out of it. And so he’ll put it into your heart to pursue her, and you’ll do whatever it takes to have her. Then one day you’ll go to her father and ask for her hand, and Allah will soften her father’s heart so that he’ll allow the union between you. You will marry her, and realize how lucky you are, and that despite her flaws you have been given the perfect complement to yourself. You can see in her eyes everything good you want for yourself, and you realize that every night that good lies beside you. Marriage will be difficult, she’ll be difficult, but she’ll be something you’ll pursue the best in, always thinking of her first, considering how she feels, and determined to treat her better than any other man on earth could have.

And so you two will grow old together, and if you did things right you’ll fall in love with her again and again and again each day, but only if you realize that love isn’t something you find but something you create. It’s something that abounds from the realization that you are both flawed, the realization that you’re both frayed, and that your union works best when following God’s design. You see his design and see that Allah braids you two together, and despite your flaws and your fraying, you’re made stronger than you two ever were separate You’ll realize that your families should be there for you, that being patient and not rushing is a key to success, and that putting God before each other is most important.

Then there will come a day when you realize that losing her would be worse than death itself, and so you hope and pray to God that you pass away before she does, because otherwise you know you would live the rest of your life dying from the poison of your broken heart. So you pray and pray and pray that God bring you home, before he brings her, not only so that you don’t have to live without her, but so that you can beg God to let her in to jannah for how perfect she has been to you.

(via lightscameracapture)
We’re tired of war. I, for one, have had enough of bloodshed, death and destruction. But I also can no longer tolerate the return to a deeply unjust status quo. I can no longer agree to live in this open-air prison. We can no longer tolerate to be treated as sub-humans, deprived of our most basic human rights. We are trapped here, trapped between two deaths: death by Israeli bombs and missiles, and death by Israel’s blockade of Gaza.
Mohammed Suliman, Palestinian human rights worker in Gaza, "From Gaza: I would rather die in dignity than agree to living in an open-air prison" (via fotojournalismus)

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

My parents have been married for over 30 years and I have been raised in their love. My mother told me my father used to send her a handwritten love letter every day when they were young in Somalia and sometimes twice a day when he missed her something bad. Love is having babies and fleeing a country in war together. It is being scared and being brave anyway. It is missing each other and always being friends. My parent’s love taught me that you need more than beautiful words for love to survive. Love is hard work, it is a commitment every day, it is doing what is necessary to make sure the other person is ok. My father somehow took care of a family of 12+ on a taxi cab driver’s salary and studied by a lamp’s light every night. My mother raised 10 children in a country hostile to their very existence with nothing but pure wit and strength. So I learned early on that love must manifest in actions. My favorite memory of them is how my mother would wait to eat until my father came home every day and them sitting together just laughing, talking, and loving. One time, my father took my mother’s hand and looked at us sitting around the table and told us, ‘you know, I love this woman. She is my best friend.’ And the way my mother still looks at my father, I know he’s not the only one who feels that way.
Yasmin Mohamed Yonis, in an interview for the Black Love Project (via ethiopienne)

Pure.

(via amaalsdrifting)
The child wandered through
a dilapidated neighborhood
with strength in her smile and
youth in her eyes. A shawl kept
her warm, vibrant hues refusing
to fade away despite the smears
of ashen grey here and there.
She cradled a rusty music box in
tiny hands. It played an out-of-tune
melody, reminiscent of days long
gone and comfort out of reach.

A conversation with her, however,
would tell you that all hope has not
gone up in smoke; that there is still
a liveliness found within children from
shattered shelters, an innocence
that cannot be torn away as
easily as child from mother.

Yes, there is hope in a
generation that still lives on.
Noor ShirazieThe Spirit of Kabul (via aestheticintrovert)
What makes the non-South Asian person’s use of the bindi problematic is the fact that a pop star like Selena Gomez wearing one is guaranteed to be better received than I would if I were to step out of the house rocking a dot on my forehead. On her, it’s a bold new look; on me, it’s a symbol of my failure to assimilate. On her, it’s unquestionably cool; on me, it’s yet another marker of my Otherness, another thing that makes me different from other American girls. If the use of the bindi by mainstream pop stars made it easier for South Asian women to wear it, I’d be all for its proliferation — but it doesn’t. They lend the bindi an aura of cool that a desi woman simply can’t compete with, often with the privilege of automatic acceptance in a society when many non-white women must fight for it.
Beyond Bindis: Why Cultural Appropriation Matters (via galifreyy)

On point, thank you!

(via faithunitydiscipline)
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